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Even those of us who have experienced it find the past 50 years of change resulting from the electronic age of communication difficult to believe. Can you believe the state-owned log cabin where Sam Houston taught school in 1812 did not have a photograph of him to display? Furthermore, the b…

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In the event your memory is hazy after 40 years, or if that was prior to your arrival on the Blount scene, I thought you would appreciate a brief look at Alex Haley’s 1976 book, “Roots: The Saga of an American Family.”

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We are very appreciative of the family of Jackie Sims of Knoxville, who was persistent in their search for the missing Tennessee Historical Commission Marker of the first meeting of Blount County Court in September 1795.

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The first Blount County resident to serve as Tennessee governor and our county’s most famous national leader, Sam Houston, was duly recognized this past weekend for the first time in 171 years.

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One of the biggest blights to Blount County as a great place to live is a widespread disregard for the law, especially in and around traffic on our public roads, which is a serious threat to each of us.

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Whether it is called a “bike” Trail, Greenway or walkway to enjoy the scenery, this Blount County seed in Townsend is another example of how forward-thinking residents have built Blount County into a better place to live and raise a family.

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It has been heartwarming days as many of you have written, called, or come by to wish me well in retirement. I officially retired Dec. 31, and will serve as Times Editor Emeritus, a title I think one is supposed to have earned from what he or she has done in the past.

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As we as a nation move toward determining a 2015 national collegiate football champion team it is interesting to look back to 1930 when Maryville College by comparative scores ranked 27 points better than Knute Rockne’s undefeated, No. 1 and national champion Notre Dame.

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Perhaps our biggest surprise in researching the Babcock story was to find that Harriet Babcock, daughter of Alcoa’s first mayor, was chairman of the board of the “MoonPie company” in Chattanooga when she died Nov. 21, 1990.

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In front of company-built houses at the upper left of the painting is a puff of steam from a train engine, just in front of the commissary, which was located at the intersection where Eidson Street (from the left) dead ends into Wright (formerly Wright’s Ferry) Road.

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Babcock Lumber Co. officials, with national headquarters in Pittsburgh, Pa., were well aware of the declining source of hardwood lumber in the northeast as the 1900s arrived. It was with great foresight, under the leadership of founder Edward Vose Babcock, the firm moved to establish major p…

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While the family of A. J. Fisher Sr. got its local start in Walland where the senior Fisher managed the Schlosser Leather Co. plant for 20 years, they were never far from better education even in days of more limited transportation and communication.

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With our easy source of leather today and wide use of other materials, especially for shoes, we tend to ignore the outstanding significance of leather and tanyards in 1900. Whether it was for leather harness for horses or shoes, it was a key item. As late as 1930, many well-to-do families ha…

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Its beginning came as the Shay, a new type of train engine for lumbering was going into wide use. The Shay engine had regular fire-tube boilers offset to the left to provide space for, and counterbalance the weight of, a three-cylinder “motor,” mounted vertically on the right side with longi…

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John V. Fisher of Newport, grandfather of the well-known Maryville family, was planning to build a tannery in Blount County on Little River. It was to be located at a place that became known as Walland, eight miles downstream on Little River from a cove that became Townsend.

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Logger John Shea was known for his construction of wooden skidways on which teams of mules pulled massive logs down the mountain to rail access for Little River Lumber Co. in the Smokies. At 2.5 miles in length, this was the longest.

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For readers who missed the above photograph in The Times recently, Alan LeQuire is a member of a Blount County family which has become leaders in medicine and art in Tennessee as well as Blount County.

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Rarely do I take a day off but every few years one needs a few days off for personal pleasure and to get one’s life work in better order for the days ahead. That’s where I am now.

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Establishment of industry in Blount County prior to 1920 provided jobs and led to communities and three cities. We plan to run a continuing article giving information, correcting some earlier historical errors resulting from casual conversation and give many who were born since then a view o…

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To complete Blount County’s early railroad history, in 1907 Tennessee and Carolina Southern built a line south from Maryville to the Little Tennessee River then up along the river to Chilhowee. In a rush effort in 1915, it was extended to Calderwood to facilitate construction of ALCOA’s Cheo…

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That’s why Jerry Hodge and others interested in history enjoy learning facts which few, if any, are aware. Most of the community associates Jerry with the Airport new car dealerships and a collection of antique automobiles, but Trains?

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Several things have interrupted my failure to write about this very unusual experience of a few months ago. Surgery was probably the major interruption but sometimes that disease known as procrastination hits all of us, regardless of age.

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At this period in history it is interesting to take a look at the impact of land explorers on our nation’s history and its development. It is rarely done. As an educational opportunity for this writer and our readers, we are including some highlights from what Richard K. Kolb did in a recent…

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As we complete last week’s column on air refueling today, I need to call attention to an error. The current model of KC-135 tanker, used both locally and in the regular Air Force, is the KC-135R.

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In 1982, a local archaeological expedition, led by Memphis attorney Jerry O. Potter, uncovered what was believed to be the wreckage of Sultana. Blackened wooden deck planks and timbers were found about 32 feet under a soybean field on the Arkansas side, about four miles from Memphis.