In TVA’s March online newsletter “River Neighbors,” there is a recount of the record rainfall Tennessee received in February. Some areas saw nearly 14 inches in two weeks, falling on ground already saturated from a record 67+ inches of rain in 2018.

The 49 TVA dams stored at least 3.5 trillion gallons of water to reduce downstream impacts, while eight of the nine main stem Tennessee River dams at times simultaneously released more than a million gallons per second, led by Pickwick at 4 million gallons per second.

Last month TVA worked to avert more than $1.6 billion in damages by helping to reduce or eliminate flooding in several cities. For example, Chattanooga water levels would have been 19 feet above flood stage and caused more than a billion dollars in damages without TVA river management efforts. Annually it helps prevent about $300 million in estimated flood damages in the region. To receive River Neighbors via email go to www.tva.gov/Environment.

The North Carolina hatchery supported trout waters opened to fishing on April 6. The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will be stocking about 930,000 trout on more than 900 miles of trout streams for the next four months, and anglers are encouraged to take some home to dinner. Hatchery supported trout waters, are marked by green-and-white signs.

About 96 percent of the stocked trout will average 10 inches long and the rest will exceed 14 inches. Daily creel limit is seven trout with no minimum size or bait restriction. For future stocking schedules and more information go to the fishing section of www.ncwildlife.org, or call the N.C. Inland Fisheries Division at 919-707-0220. Trout season goes until Feb. 29, 2020.

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency will host a CWD public meeting at 7:00 p.m. on April 9th at Fayette Academy in Somerville. There will be a report on the most recent CWD testing and the state’s plans moving forward. A dialogue with the public will follow. For those who cannot attend in person, there will be a live stream of the meeting on Facebook where viewers will be given an opportunity to ask questions as well.

In other CWD news, TWRA has produced a video seminar about CWD in Tennessee, featuring CWD Coordinator Chuck Yoest and Extension Wildlife Health Specialist and Wildlife Veterinarian Dr. Daniel Grove. The video has some best practices for hunters and non-hunters in positive and high-risk counties. See it on the social media section of www.tnwildlife.org.

A great article was written about all the latest developments in CWD by the good people at Realtree. It is worth a read at www.realtree.com/deer-hunting/articles.

The Chester County deer that you may have seen on the news was tested and came back as negative for CWD. This was certainly a sick animal but it did not have CWD.

Email wiest.tom@gmail.com to share with your news and comments with Tom Wiest.

Tom Wiest is a long time columnist on all matters outdoors. He welcomes news, questions and comments from readers.

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