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Poland’s environment minister says laboratory tests following a mass fish die-off have detected high salinity levels but no mercury in the Oder River. That means the mystery is continuing as to what killed tons of fish in Central Europe. The minister said analyses of river samples taken in both Poland and Germany revealed the elevated salt levels. She says comprehensive toxicology studies are still underway in Poland. The Oder River runs from Czechia and along the border between Poland and Germany before flowing into the Baltic Sea. Poland's prime minister vowed Saturday to do everything possible to limit the environmental devastation. A reward has been offered for information about those responsible.

AP

The candidates running in Saturday’s primary election to succeed term-limited Democratic Gov. David Ige include a former first lady, a retired mixed martial arts champion and a congressman who moonlights as a Hawaiian Airlines pilot. Democratic U.S. Rep. Kaiali‘i Kahele’s decision to run for governor has opened up his congressional seat representing rural Oahu and the Neighbor Islands. In the U.S. Senate, incumbent Democratic Sen. Brian Schatz is also up for reelection and is facing a primary challenge from a little-known candidate. Hawaii is a vote-by-mail state so voters have been mailing their ballots and placing them in drop boxes across the islands since late last month.

AP

Salman Rushdie remained hospitalized Saturday after suffering serious injuries in a stabbing attack as he was about to speak in western New York. Rushdie's agent says the 75-year-old suffered a damaged liver, severed nerves in an arm and an eye, and was on a ventilator and unable to speak. Rushdie was likely to lose the injured eye. Rushdie's novel “The Satanic Verses” drew death threats from Iran’s leader in the 1980s. Authorities identified the alleged attacker as 24-year-old Hadi Matar and said he was facing attempted murder and assault charges. A message was left with his lawyer seeking comment.

AP

A developer has unearthed human remains that could be two centuries old while digging to lay the foundation of a new Nashville project not far from a Civil War fort and a cemetery dating back to 1822. In a court petition, AJ Capital Management noted the discovery occurred in the neighborhood near Fort Negley while the company was working on its Nashville Warehouse Co. mixed development, which will include apartments and business space. The company is asking a Nashville chancery judge for permission to move the remains to the Nashville City Cemetery. It's unclear whose remains the crews found. Enslaved as well as freed Black people were forced to build the fort for the Union, and hundreds died.

AP

Ukrainian officials say Russia’s military shelled residential areas across Ukraine while their own fighters damaged the last working bridge over a river in occupied southern Ukraine, hurting Russia's ability to resupply its military. The mayor of the eastern city of Kramatorsk said a Russian rocket attack killed three people and wounded 13 others Friday night. Further west, the governor of the Dnipropetrovsk region reported more Russian shelling of a city not far from Europe’s largest nuclear power plant. Ukrainian military intelligence alleged that Russian troops also shelled the plant. The Russian Defense Ministry, meanwhile, claimed Saturday its forces had taken control of a village on the outskirts of city that pro-Moscow seized in 2014.

AP

Ukraine’s health minister has accused Russian authorities of committing a crime against humanity by blocking access to affordable medicines in areas its forces have occupied since invading the country 5 1/2 months ago. In an interview with The Associated Press, Ukrainian Health Minister Viktor Liashko said Russian authorities repeatedly have blocked efforts to provide state-subsidized drugs to people in occupied cities, towns and villages. The World Health Organization says it recorded 445 attacks on Ukrainian hospitals and other health care facilities as of Aug. 11 that directly resulted in 86 deaths and 105 injuries. But Liashko said the much higher number of casualties caused by damaged roads and bridges delaying ambulances “cannot be calculated.”

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The Fulmar S vessel carrier with 12000 ton of corn makes its way from the port in Odesa, Ukraine, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2022. Ukraine signed an agreement with Turkey and the U.N. on July 22 clearing the way for Ukraine to export 22 million tons of corn and other grain stuck at ports and in silos since the Russian invasion, and to make room for the export of the upcoming harvest. (AP Photo/Nina Lyashonok)

AP

America sizzled through some hot nights last month, enough to make history. Federal meteorologists say the Lower 48 states in July set a record for overnight warmth. The average overnight temperature for the continental United States in July was 63.6 degrees, which is the highest in 128 years of recordkeeping. This matters because cooler temperatures overnight are crucial for people, animals and plants to recover from the warmth of daytime heat waves. In the U.S., the nighttime is warming faster than the daytime. Climate scientists say that's a signature of human-caused global warming.